Author Topic: Tip in  (Read 333 times)

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Offline Woz in Oz

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Tip in
on: October 19, 2021, 12:07:30 PM
So after riding my new Daytona Iím a little less than satisfied with its tip in into corners. I know I can lower the front end by loosening the triple clamps and sliding up the shocks. Does anyone else feel this bike needs a bit of encouragement into corners? Itís a personal thing and obviously a comparison judgement so just thought Iíd ask before playing around with something professionals at the factory have set up. Surely they realised it was a sports bike!

Offline 765rocks

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Re: Tip in
Reply #1 on: October 19, 2021, 05:08:00 PM
*Originally Posted by Woz in Oz [+]
So after riding my new Daytona Iím a little less than satisfied with its tip in into corners. I know I can lower the front end by loosening the triple clamps and sliding up the shocks. Does anyone else feel this bike needs a bit of encouragement into corners? Itís a personal thing and obviously a comparison judgement so just thought Iíd ask before playing around with something professionals at the factory have set up. Surely they realised it was a sports bike!

Mine is sweet as to be honest  :028: :028:

Offline aardvark9

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Re: Tip in
Reply #2 on: October 19, 2021, 08:51:15 PM
*Originally Posted by Woz in Oz [+]
So after riding my new Daytona Iím a little less than satisfied with its tip in into corners. I know I can lower the front end by loosening the triple clamps and sliding up the shocks. Does anyone else feel this bike needs a bit of encouragement into corners? Itís a personal thing and obviously a comparison judgement so just thought Iíd ask before playing around with something professionals at the factory have set up. Surely they realised it was a sports bike!

First off, my thoughts are coming from no knowledge of what type of riding you're doing, your experience, and previous bike(s).  I have about 80 track days in the past 2.5 years and a handful of races and I do a lot of street riding on a Street Triple and a BMW GS.  This year I've ridden at least 10 different bikes on track.  I am by no means an expert but I am actively trying to build my skill and knowledge.  With the disclaimer out of the way....

The cause of this could be so many things but honestly I'd hold off on making any geometry adjustments until I'd first got the bike setup appropriately for my riding (road or track, skill level, etc.), if necessary, by a qualified suspension professional.  After that, if it seems reluctant to turn in, I'd be suspect of a locked inside arm which in turn will make it difficult to turn the bike.  I've been known to completely let go of the left-hand bar on left-hand turns just to confirm that I'm supporting myself with my lower body.  If you're coming from a bike with handlebars, you will likely need to adjust your riding to really focus on locking in with your lower body to keep the inside arm light on the bar; more upright bikes are very forgiving because you have so much leverage with taller/wider bars.  My suspension guy didn't change the height of the forks until we changed to a 60-series rear profile tire and that was to match the added ride height of a taller rear tire.  With that said, at no point did I ever feel like the Daytona (whether  stock or track-prepped) was reluctant to turn in and in most magazine reviews the Daytonas are acclaimed for being nimble.
Last Edit: October 19, 2021, 08:53:34 PM by aardvark9

Offline Woz in Oz

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Re: Tip in
Reply #3 on: October 20, 2021, 12:37:52 AM
I'm not really considering a full suspension rework on this bike apart from maybe spring changes as (if) necessary. Yes there are many factors affecting handling and everything adjusted impacts something else. One thing I hadn't considered is the tyres and their profile/curvature. My VFR800 is a somewhat heavier bike by some 70kgs  but likes to take turns while the Daytona seems to take a bit more encouragement on initial turn in. They have the same size (on label) tyres, but in different brands. I might need to ride some more of my favourite twisties back to back. Apart from the weight feel, the Daytona doesn't feel 'nimble'.

Offline aardvark9

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Re: Tip in
Reply #4 on: October 20, 2021, 12:56:26 AM
*Originally Posted by Woz in Oz [+]
I'm not really considering a full suspension rework on this bike apart from maybe spring changes as (if) necessary. Yes there are many factors affecting handling and everything adjusted impacts something else. One thing I hadn't considered is the tyres and their profile/curvature. My VFR800 is a somewhat heavier bike by some 70kgs  but likes to take turns while the Daytona seems to take a bit more encouragement on initial turn in. They have the same size (on label) tyres, but in different brands. I might need to ride some more of my favourite twisties back to back. Apart from the weight feel, the Daytona doesn't feel 'nimble'.

One other thought is tire pressures.  I honestly don't recall the street tire pressures on the Daytona since mine is all track but on my Street Triple running Rosso Corsa IIs, which are not too far off the SuperCorsa SP, I run 35F/33R (psi) for back roads riding.  I also had a 1998 VFR800 (and a 1990 VFR750) a while back--great bike.  I finally replaced mine at 55k miles with a 2014 Street Triple (that was my commuting bike then).  I'd always wished they'd update the VFR with going back to the gear driven cams, shed ~100lbs, and bump HP by about +20.  It's been a few years since I had that bike and I never had a Daytona at the same time but I do recall it being more upright, which could have provided better bar leverage.

 


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