02 Mar 24, 23:56 pm

Recent Posts

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1
Thought I'd post an update as after telling my wife "I'll just be out in the garage for a little bit" I got this upgrade done last night.  I installed the 17RCS Corta Corsa master cylinder, Stahlbus bleeders across the board, and bled the ABS module using TuneECU and Castrol SRF fluid.

I ended up having no clearance issues on the throttle housing, with a few small tweaks:

- I rotated the entire handlebar tube forward maybe 30*, to optimize for the shape of the housing providing the maximum possible clearance
- I used a poker to "release" the switchgear housing from its guide/support (that locks into a hole drilled in the bar) - the switchcube is still slid onto the support, but it is not fully clipped in.  This lets the switchcube creep a few mm closer to the throttle housing, but keeps it from being able to rotate around the bar.
- I replaced the zip-tie holding the wires to the switchcube, putting the clasp on the under-side, letting the M/C sit a little bit closer to the switchcube.

All these had the cumulative effect of letting the master cylinder sit maybe 4-5mm further to the right, closer to the throttle housing.  With this, even with the reach dialed in pretty far on the lever, I have no issues on clearance.  Here is me absolutely wailing on the lever, squeezing it just about as hard as I can, and still with about 4mm of clearance.



Compared to the stock setup, you can see that the two housings are just ever so slightly closer together.







Some other thoughts -

- Bleeding the ABS with TuneECU was very easy. Probably not necessary to do every time, but it only takes a minute, so I will definitely do it again.
- I forgot to retract the piston on the rear brake before bleeding, which may lead to a little bit of extra old fluid remaining behind the piston - I wasn't too worried about it once the fluid started coming out clear and free of bubbles.
- When you're installing Stahlbus valves, be sure to check whether the valve is open before you start bleeding!  I made a bit of a mess not noticing that one of the caliper bleeders was open from the package.
- I used a bleed method for the fronts that comes from my experience as a bicycle mechanic - I filled two syringes with fresh fluid, and connected one to each caliper with the system totally dry (and rotated doing this also on the M/C) - alternating pushing new fluid out and pulling it in.  The constant back-and-forth of the fluid gives lots of opportunities for bubbles to make their way out of the system and into the syringes.  This led to a REALLY solid lever feel.  It feels great!
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Maintenance and Servicing / Re: Oil weight for forks?
« Last post by KeithS on Today at 05:06:23 am »
It calls for Ohlins 01309 filled to 150mm from the top of the tube (476cc). Looks like it is listed as 5w.
3
Maintenance and Servicing / Oil weight for forks?
« Last post by joezilla1 on February 29, 2024, 06:45:48 pm »
Does anyone know the oil weight needed for the front forks?

Thanks,

—Joe
4
*Originally Posted by mgordon [+]
While I'm getting ready to install the new master cylinder, is there any particular reason to use this time to upgrade to a titanium banjo bolt?  I'm not sure if there is any benefit beyond bling (and a few grams).  I do see that the Brembo banjo bolt only has a hole on one side of the bolt, and most of the titanium ones have a hole on two sides.  Not sure if that makes any difference, though.

I’ve had both on the same master cylinder and never noticed a difference. I did use a titanium bolt but only because it was already drilled for safety wire and I already had it.
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While I'm getting ready to install the new master cylinder, is there any particular reason to use this time to upgrade to a titanium banjo bolt?  I'm not sure if there is any benefit beyond bling (and a few grams).  I do see that the Brembo banjo bolt only has a hole on one side of the bolt, and most of the titanium ones have a hole on two sides.  Not sure if that makes any difference, though.
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*Originally Posted by aardvark9 [+]
I recall drilling a couple but that one may have been just a pressure fit--it's been a long time but one of the switch cubes only had a piece that slides in on the underside and I don't think there's a nubbin that would go into a hole on it.  Long time now so I can't say for certain.

No worries, thanks.  I went out to the garage and played around, and there is a hole to locate both the throttle housing and the switchcube.  I ordered the 17RCS Corsa Corta, so was starting to play around and see if there is any way to get any more clearance on the throtle, but will be tough to say until I have the M/C on hand.  One thing I didn't consider in my earlier posts is that if you rotate the throttle 180* to where it is smaller, then the wires coming out of it are facing completely the wrong way.

I may have to hold off on installing it for now as I am not sure there's enough real estate on the stock clip-ons to swap the cube over to the left of the lever.

Thanks!
7
*Originally Posted by mgordon [+]
One more question on this.  Did you drill a new hole for the little locator clip on the switchgear when you moved it inboard of the brake lever?

I recall drilling a couple but that one may have been just a pressure fit--it's been a long time but one of the switch cubes only had a piece that slides in on the underside and I don't think there's a nubbin that would go into a hole on it.  Long time now so I can't say for certain.
8
One more question on this.  Did you drill a new hole for the little locator clip on the switchgear when you moved it inboard of the brake lever?
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Maintenance and Servicing / Re: Brake bleed order
« Last post by Sordo on February 22, 2024, 12:28:05 pm »
First the brake pump, then the brake calipers.
On the 675 the line was first routed to the right caliper and from there to the left caliper. On Moto2 the lines go separately to the brake calipers
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Maintenance and Servicing / Brake bleed order
« Last post by mgordon on February 22, 2024, 04:52:15 am »
I've always heard you should bleed the furthest caliper (the left) first, then the right, then the master cylinder.  However, the Daytona 675R service manual says:

The master cylinder should always be bled first. Bleed each caliper in turn before bleeding the master cylinder.

... I don't even understand what that means!

What do you all think?

Probably it doesn't matter too much...
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yeasty-need